Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding |  +1 (360) 385-4948 | info@nwswb.edu

Veteran’s Benefits for Education

Yes, We are Veteran Friendly! We have students of varied ages and backgrounds at the School, including veterans, recent high school graduates and retirees. Tuition assistance is available to US Veterans with education benefits. For information about benefits, how to apply for benefits, and to view payment rates, go to www.gibill.va.gov. To apply for benefits, complete a VONAPP (Veterans…

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Federal Student Aid

The Boat School is accredited as a private institution of higher learning through The Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). Students enrolled in our 9 or 12 month boat-building programs might qualify to participate in the Pell Grant, FSEOG School Based Grants, Direct Student Loan (Stafford/William D. Ford), and the Plus Loan (for parent borrowers) programs. While…

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Sentinel-24 – long-boarding the hull

Instructor Sean Koomen (in dark orange shirt) leads his class long-boarding the Sentinal-24 hull. Longboarding the hull is done with a long board onto which sandpaper is fastened. The board bridges minor imperfections in the hull and helps to being the hull to a uniform level that can support a high gloss finish. This is the first boat in…

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Plywood Construction

The new technique relies on cutting the plywood panels to exact size and butt-jointing them. It is common now, in order to increase production efficiency, to place the panels either on the inside or outside of a mould where they are held in place with temporary screws. But sometimes not even a jig is required on the smallest boats….

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Plywood Construction

The ‘ply-on-frame’ building method was developed in the 1950’s using mainly urea-formaldehyde adhesives on the then newly introduced wood medium – plywood. Many boats were designed for this relatively easy form of construction which became popular with professionals and DIY builders. Today ply-on-frame is still used, particularly on small racing dinghy classes designed originally in the 1950’s, but with…

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Cold Molded Construction

The first cold-moulded hulls commercially produced were derived from wooden aircraft technology developed during World War II. These used phenol-formaldehyde glue and vacuum pressure was employed to hold the veneers together in an autoclave oven. Hulls produced this way have proved extremely durable with a life of over 30 – 40 years. Nowadays no such plant exists and all…

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Multiple Veneer Construction

The earliest forms did not use adhesive but incorporated a cloth membrane, usually soaked in oil or paint, in between. The veneers were held together with rivets, screws or clenched nails. Epoxy adhesives can be used in the restoration of these hulls by injecting it between the veneer layers. Source: SP Systems. This article was derived from ‘Wooden Boat…

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Class of 2014!

CLASS OF 2014 at the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding. We have six students who are graduating tomorrow (June 20, 2014) after completing the School’s 9-month program. The remainder will graduate in September after completing the 12-month program. Good luck students and be sure to stay in touch with us! We are so proud of you! Pictured roughly left…

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2013 Graduation for 9-Month Programs

The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding celebrated its graduation ceremony for 9-Month Program students on June 14, 2013 at the School. Graduates represented programs in Small Craft Construction, Large Craft Construction and Contemporary Wooden Boatbuilding. Graduates receiving their diplomas were: Carey Anderson – Small Craft Gabriel Boylan – Large Craft Patrick Carlisle – Large Craft Troy Craig – Contemporary…

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